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Linkedin Marketing for Small Business

Every site – including this one – has multiple share buttons that allow visitors to share content with friends and colleagues.

With over 700 million users, Facebook gets a lot of attention.

But what do you share on Facebook? I know for me, I’m likely to share newspaper articles, pictures and videos from YouTube that amuse or entertain me.

What I’m not likely to share is a link to help you market your business website.

Don’t get offended. My friends and family just don’t care about professional speakers, consultants, or widget factories. So why would I pass your site along to them?

Now I might be inclined to share your site on Twitter, if there is something interesting, that my followers might also find worth looking at.

So that leaves Google+ and Linkedin. Now I don’t use Google+ very much at all. But I can see how it could become very valuable if it ever hits critical mass. Especially since it actually does effect your ranking on the big engine.

Linkedin marketing is a much more practical way to promote your business in the social media world.

Simply by placing a Linkedin button on each page of your site, you are inviting visitors to share your site with professional associates and groups.

If you are a small business having your blog post or product end up on a group, or shared to a number of professional contacts by a visitor, has the potential to be a very profitable endorsement.

You can even set up your social media machine to automatically post your content to Linkedin by tying your RSS feed to your professional profile and Twitter account.

So what are you waiting for? Here is the link to add the Linkedin Share Button to your site.

https://developer.linkedin.com/plugins/share-button

If you need help implementing this, you can always send me a note.

Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should.

Everything is connected.

The tools are out there to have all your social media update like a fine tuned machine.

With very little effort you can set yourself up so that each time you update your blog or post a new video to YouTube, it automatically goes to Twitter, Linkedin, Facebook or any of the other half dozen social media hubs we’re all encouraged to join each week.

But just because you can, doesn’t mean you have to.

That’s right. You don’t have to connect everything.

A few years back when all this was very new, I had a guy I barely remember from high school “friend” me on Facebook.

Within minutes I was getting information about his catering business. Needless to say, he didn’t last very long on my feed.

At the time it got me thinking about why I’m on Facebook and what the expectation of my friends are.

While I’m sure at the time they were bored silly of pictures of my newborn baby, even that was probably less irritating than the business-related tweets and Linkedin updates that were also going to my Facebook account.

So a decision was made. I severed my Facebook account from Twitter and Linkedin. I then tweaked the security settings so that only real friends were welcome in my digitally walled garden.

This allows me to separate the personal from professional.

Now when I get a Facebook friend request from a potential business contact, I politely refer them to my Linkedin and Twitter accounts.

That doesn’t mean you can’t use Facebook for business. You just have to be smart about it and create a Facebook business page, so that folks who are interested in you as a professional, continue to get what they need, while your friends and family aren’t turned off by your latest blog posting on “Leadership.”

So you want to publish a book: publicity and marketing

This series was originally posted in 2008

Publicity and marketing is harder to speak about at this stage. We spent the better part of September looking at different firms to see what each had to offer.

As Jim has said to me many times, a lot of these places like to have release parties that do more for the author’s ego than for actual book sales – because attendees are more likely to be friends and family rather than actual media contacts. So in that respect, for an author on a small budget, it’s better to direct your funds toward activities that are most likely to land you in the press and generate some sales.

For Moose we decided to go with Meisner Publicity in Toronto. Headed by Susan Meisner, they seem to have no end of connections and come to the table with plenty of good ideas to get press.

This is the one area where I think if you absolutely have to cut expenses you can. But don’t delude yourself. You’ll need to be a shameless advocate of your book 24/7 if you want to succeed. You’ll have to buy some books on writing great news releases and be fearless and creative when it comes to targeting media. If you have any hesitation about going it alone – get a publicist.

For my own part, I built a little site that’s still in beta called A Writer’s Market. I like to think of it as a farmer’s market for authors. Have a quick look and see how it’s coming along. If you know an author, then send a link. I really need some folks to help test it.

I hope you found this little series useful. If you have any questions, send them along and I’ll be happy to answer them as best I can.